#1 Training for a three-hour marathon

#1 Training for a three-hour marathon

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The London Marathon attracts over 35,000 runners each year.

“My feeling is that any day I am too busy to run is a day that I am too busy.” – John Bryant. 

Running the London Marathon has always been on my bucket list. The trouble is, I’m not the greatest running fan – so why run one?

Firstly, I love a challenge. Plus, if I can raise money for charity along the way that’s even better.

To make things a little more difficult, I’m aiming to qualify for the 2019 London Marathon through the ‘Good for Age’ classification.

This means achieving a time of three hours and five minutes or faster at any marathon in the world from the 1st January 2017.

Running such a speedy time has its advantages. I’ll be fitter, stronger and I’ll spend less time in training and running the 26.2 miles distance itself. I’ll also begin the London event in a specially designated pen, which means I can avoid the dreaded 30-minute walk to the start line with the masses – reducing the risk of getting cold, wasting energy and running a slow time.

So, do I need my sanity tested? Some may argue yes, but I’m lucky to have stumbled across a comprehensive training plan which should help me run a sub three-hour time in London.

Ideally, it takes six months to train for your marathon of choice, but running one quickly takes at least two years of preparation.

It’s this preparation which has thrown me massively. I had hoped to start training in October but, after a good deal of research, it became clear I couldn’t just start training when I wanted.

As a running rookie, I never realised how detailed the planning would have to be.

However, after setting training and meal plans, choosing running locations, seeing my GP and a physio to get the green light to train, I can now get started.

The planning

An initial 5-week training plan will lead into a fresh 24-week scheme, taking me into my first full 26.2 miler – the Bournemouth Marathon in October.

From there, six-month cycles of training – each culminating in a marathon – will begin. I’ll aim to run my second in April 2018, sneaking in another before the cut-off in June if I haven’t yet run under 3hr05m.

Provided I’ve got the qualification time in the bag, I’ll run the next marathon in October 2018 before London in April 2019.

The progress
In writing a blog through my training, I hope to give an insight into how much of a challenge it will be.

I’ll be posting pictures of my Strava times, nutritious recipes, route plans, motivational quotes, running facts/stats and handy tips along the way – roughly once every two weeks.

So stay tuned for all the stumbles, falls, pains and gains as I embark on what could be an immensely rewarding journey.