Bayern Munich – The world’s first hybrid football team

Over the last few years the concept of all things hybrid has spread across the world. We now have hybrid cars – both on the road and in motorsport – there are hybrid road bikes and even ‘phablets’ which are a cross between a smartphone and a tablet.

There has, however, never been a hybrid football team – until now.

Bayern Munich, the German, European and world champions, are arguably the first tangible example of such a thing in the sporting, not technological, world.

A couple of seasons ago, Bayern were eclipsed in the Bundesliga by the burgeoning force of Borussia Dortmund.

‘Die Schwarzgelben’ had revolutionised German football with their aggressive defensive pressing –  ‘Gegenpressing’ – and their razor-sharp attacking play which regularly made fatal incisions into Bayern’s defence – most notably during a 5-2 German cup final win in 2012.

Dortmund’s powerful arrival onto the German footballing scene provoked a reaction in Munich. Bayern manager Jupp Heynckes finally had the barometer that would help elevate his side and convert their huge potential – setting them on the path to becoming the world beaters they are now.

Heynckes’ response was to recalibrate Dortmund’s ‘gegenpressing’ – using it in a way that would suit Bayern. The results were devastating.

The following season Bayern defeated Dortmund in the German Supercup and later went on to win the treble – including a last-minute win over their arch-rivals in the Champions League final at Wembley.

Yet, it was Bayern’s performance in their semi-final against Barcelona – then comfortably held to be the best team in the world – that drew the most attention as they crushed them 7-0 on aggregate.

In the first leg they swamped their Spanish opponents, asphyxiating them with a brutal display of counter-attacking and finishing them off with startling lethality in a 4-0 win.

Barcelona’s Camp Nou had long been a fortress – particularly in European football – but Bayern flattened it in the second leg, cruising to a 3-0 victory.

The Bavarians sent shockwaves through the footballing community – especially the Catalonian one – and from there they have built upon that success.

Heynckes left Bayern last summer but was replaced by Pep Guardiola – a man who had been the chief architect of Barcelona’s rise to the top of the game.

Guardiola has not hindered Bayern’s progress though – he has sharpened it.

In just eight months at the helm he has developed the German giants into an all-conquering machine and the theme of hybridity is the ideal way to describe their style of play.

A key feature of the modern Bayern is the seamless transition from defence to attack.

Guardiola has drilled a sublime one-touch passing game into his new side, which serves to speed up the way Bayern shift the ball from their penalty area to the other.

Full-backs David Alaba and Rafinha have a licence to raid forward – particularly Alaba who is rapidly developing into the most potent left-back in the world.

However, it is when Bayern are faced with a wall of 11 players in front of them that they are at their most fluid.

Their defence, midfield and strike force all combine in each venture forwards, with an interchangability that is unprecedented in the modern game.

So much so that some photographs of Bayern’s offensive shape this season show a 1-8-1 formation – an almost incomprehensible form for a football team to sustain.

That ‘midfield’ eight usually comprises Alaba, Rafinha, Arjen Robben, Franck Ribery, Bastian Schweinsteiger, Toni Kroos, Phillip Lahm and Thomas Mueller.

Eagle-eyed readers will notice Lahm’s absence in defence. Only a few years ago Lahm was seen as one of the best full-backs in the world, but Guardiola has transformed him into a free spirit that roams across midfield.

Effectively, Lahm acts an important cog between defence and midfield but, such is Bayern’s constant fluidity, the diminutive captain can pop up on either flank to assist wingers Robben and Ribery with attacks.

In Schweinsteiger, Bayern have the typical box-to-box midfielder – himself reformed from a flamboyant winger in his early career.

His partner in central midfield is contract rebel Kroos, whose growing influence during Bayern’s games has seen him linked with several top clubs in Europe.

Then there is Mueller – one of the most underrated players in world football at the present time.

Mueller has the ability to play as a striker – indeed that is where he started in his early career – but in recent seasons he has acted on the edges of an attacking three.

That Mueller is also an extremely hard-working midfielder enables his side to spring forward in numbers while also knowing that he will return goalside quickly if his side loses the ball.

This takes a huge amount of discipline and drilling on the training ground, and Guardiola must take credit for that.

What Guardiola has created is, in effect, the all-round football team.

In cricket, there are all-rounders, in cycling there are rouleurs and now in football there are hybrids.

Bayern’s influence on world football is now so strong that teams in England are dropping players whose talent only extends to one area of the game.

This is best evidenced in footballers such as Juan Mata and Mesut Özil.

Mata was allowed to leave Chelsea by Jose Mourinho in January. The Spaniard’s attacking quality was not in doubt, but his willingness to defend was.

Mourinho is keen to have the same all-round, hybrid player that Guardiola has created at Bayern. Consequently, players such as Ramires, Oscar and Eden Hazard were preferred to Mata for their greater work without the ball.

The same is true of Özil at his new club Arsenal. Although Real Madrid didn’t let him leave because of his lack of defensive diligence, Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger dropped the German due to his ‘tiredness’.

After noticing Özil’s complete disinterest in tracking back, many critics saw this as a veiled signal to Özil that his work rate must improve.

As talented as Mata and Özil are, they are not the complete all-round footballer. They could even be considered a weakness if they do not perform to their high attacking standards because they offer little in defence.

This is where Bayern have excelled. They have changed the type of player needed to perform at the highest level and have quickly set up a squad containing players who are comfortable and capable of playing in several positions.

What used to be the utility player, a rare breed, is now a necessity.

Even goalkeepers are being asked to play as sweepers – good examples of those are Bayern’s Manuel Neuer and Tottenham’s Hugo Lloris.

Having such a goalkeeper allows teams have an extra layer of defensive security, and that is just one part of how the modern game is developing.

Defenders are midfielders, sometimes even attackers, midfielders are starting to flourish in any position across the width of the pitch and strikers are doing defensive duties too.

This hybridity will continue to reign in football for years to come and until then Bayern are the team to beat – just as Barcelona were when their tiki-taka football dominated the game.

The question is which team will be able to take football onto the next level and render the concept of hybridity a thing of the past?

Defoe breaks record as Spurs progress

Jermain Defoe scored his 23rd European goal for Spurs to break Martin Chivers’ record in a 2-1 win against Sheriff Tiraspol at White Hart Lane that saw them progress to the next round of the Europa League.

A drab match was enlivened by an encouraging performance from Spurs’ record-signing Erik Lamela, who opened the scoring on the hour with a simple finish before a superb run earned a penalty, which Defoe scored with aplomb.

Sheriff midfielder Ismail Isa grabbed an acrobatic consolation from close range to prevent Spurs recording a fourth consecutive clean sheet, but the North Londoners were thereafter untroubled and comfortably held on for the win.

Spurs, who rested Hugo Lloris and welcomed back Etienne Capoue from injury, dominated the early exchanges and forced the first save of the game when Mousa Dembele’s powerful shot was pushed clear by Sheriff goalkeeper Vjekoslav Tomic.

The visitors, who were playing without any away support, suddenly burst into life after a timid start when Ricardinho led a swift counter-attack before finding Ismail Isa, whose deflected shot hit the post with Brad Friedel stranded.

Moments later, a wayward pass from Christian Eriksen presented Ricardinho with a good opportunity 20 yards out, but the Brazilian could only hook his shot wide of goal.

Spurs, who had barely threatened Sheriff’s well-organised defence, then went close two minutes before the break when the lively Lamela’s cutback was deflected onto the base of Tomic’s near post.

After a dour opening to the second half, Spurs were unlucky not to take the lead when Eriksen’s well-struck drive was superbly tipped over the bar by a flying Tomic.

It was a moment that clicked Spurs into gear, and they took the lead soon afterwards when Eriksen’s scooped pass deflected perfectly into the path of Lamela, who scored with ease from twelve yards.

The Argentine forward, who has endured a tough start to his Spurs career after a £25m summer move from current Serie A leaders Roma, then turned provider when a dazzling run drew a rash challenge inside the area, leaving referee Kenn Hansen with no alternative but to point to the spot.

Lamela’s good work was rewarded when Jermain Defoe slammed home the penalty to score his fifth Europa League goal of the season, breaking Chivers’ long-standing record in the process.

At this stage, Spurs boss Andre Villas-Boas might have been expecting an uneventful finish to the game, but his team handed Sheriff a lifeline five minutes later when Friedel could only parry Cadu’s long-range shot to the feet of Isa, who tucked the ball home from a tight angle.

Drawn forward in search of an unlikely equaliser, Sheriff were always in danger of conceding a third and it almost came via Lewis Holtby, whose follow-up effort was saved by Tomic after the Croatian could only fumble a drive from substitute Harry Kane.

There was late tension in amongst the home fans when Kyle Naughton conceded a free-kick in stoppage time, but Spurs held firm and took the win which booked their place in the next round.

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Spurs ease past toothless Anzhi

First-half goals from Jermain Defoe and Nacer Chadli guided Spurs to a simple 2-0 Europa League win against an insipid Anzhi Makhachkala side at Saturn Stadium.

Spurs now lie top of Group K with maximum points from two games having kept consecutive clean sheets.

In truth, Spurs were never troubled by a limited Anzhi side, whose budget was slashed by billionaire owner Suleyman Kerimov in August, prompting an exodus of star names such as Samuel Eto’o and Willian.

The effect of the two-thirds budget cut also saw Anzhi play at FC Saturn Moscow’s compact Saturn Stadium, several hundred miles from their Dagestan home.

In cold conditions, Anzhi made an enterprising start with striker Pavel Solomatin twice troubling a high Spurs defence, but the North Londoners registered the first shot on target when Sandro’s bobbling effort found the gloves of Yevgeny Pomazan.

An uneven playing surface ensured that the fluency of both teams was hindered in a first 30 minutes that passed without incident, but Anzhi finally threatened when a firm pass from Solomatin found Serder Serderov, forcing Hugo Lloris to hastily smother the ball at the midfielder’s feet.

Spurs tried to feel their way into the game, with Lewis Holtby ubiquitous, and the German playmaker linked up with Walker down the right before cutting inside and curling a long-range shot which Pomazan acrobatically palmed clear.

Moments later Holtby turned provider for the opening goal, sliding a perfect pass into the feet of the in-form Jermain Defoe, allowing him to lash home emphatically into the roof of the net from 12 yards.

Holtby was fast proving to be the controlling influence on an otherwise indifferent first-half, and he aimed an inviting cross-field pass to Kyle Walker, affording the right-back time and space to find the incoming Nacer Chadli who swept home past the grasp of Pomazan to give the visitors a 2-0 half-time lead.

Anzhi boss Gadzhi Gadzhiyev reacted to a poor first half by fast-tracking Ivorian striker Lacina Traore onto the pitch at the restart, despite his ongoing recovery from a shoulder injury.

Traore, recognised as the last remaining big name at the club following the U-turn in ethos ordered by Kerimov, was instantly a problem for the Spurs defence.

Holding the ball up well, he started an Anzhi move which led to right-back Benoit Angbwa shooting wide from outside the area, before Spurs replied when £25m forward Erik Lamela found Chadli who curled a shot wide after a quick break – again down Anzhi’s left-hand side.

Russian full-back Andrey Eschenko was introduced before the hour-mark, and he combined with fellow substitute Traore to work Lloris following a quick move on the left as Anzhi showed signs of improvement.

Solomatin drove ambitiously from an angle to force Lloris into a smart save, but Spurs cleared the resulting corner and broke forward with Holtby tamely shooting at Pomazan.

As the ambient temperature plummeted the quality of play also dropped off, but Spurs were dealt a blow on an otherwise easy night for them when Younes Kaboul hobbled off with a quarter of the match remaining.

Spurs manager Andre Villas-Boas reacted by making two quick changes, with captain Michael Dawson replacing the Frenchman in central defence and the disappointing Lamela making way for in-form Gylfi Sigurdsson.

Solomatin again tried his luck from range late on, volleying towards goal, but Lloris calmly pushed his dipping shot wide of goal.

If the travelling Anzhi fans needed any excuse to leave early after their team’s meek display, the special charter train laid on by Kerimov to escort them back to Moscow left the ground five minutes from the end. Yet, they could have left at half-time as Spurs were never in danger of relinquishing their grip on an easily-earned three points.

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