Who are the best and worst football commentators?

Football commentators. The people armchair viewers love to hate.

There are plenty of atrocious and infuriating callers of the beautiful game out there, and also a handful of brilliant ones, but who makes my top 10 best and worst?

And before anyone pipes up about Andy Townsend, I’ve included co-commentators in the list too!

Let’s start with the good first:

10. Mike Ingham, BBC 5Live

Ingham is an entertaining commentator for those of you who are avid 5live listeners. Hardly ever culpable of making a mistake, he blends an enthusiastic commentary style with a thorough knowledge of the game. More importantly, he puts his 5live colleagues to shame.

9. Simon Brotherton, BBC

Brotherton is without doubt one of the BBC’s most underrated commentators. Experienced and articulate, he calls some of the biggest games on the Premier League calendar for Match of the Day with great success. Like Ingham, he hardly makes a mistake and is definitely worthy of a place on this countdown.

8. Clive Tyldesley, ITV

I’ve been known to call Tyldesley ‘Alive Clive’ due to his excitable style (he often sounds like a Dalek too), but generally he is a very capable commentator. His greatest work for ITV is probably the 1999 Champions League final, but can be prone to some occasional errors too. He gets bonus points for sitting next to Andy Townsend for two hours.

7. Rob Hawthorne, Sky Sports

Hawthorne is part of Sky’s respected commentary line-up, and has often called some high-profile matches. Not least the memorable Manchester derby where United’s Michael Owen snatched a 96th-minute winner in a 4-3 win. Looking back at Hawthorne’s commentary for that match on YouTube, it’s safe to say he did a fantastic job.

6. Jon Champion, ESPN

Perhaps the most respected commentator in the media, Champion is vastly experienced having worked for the BBC, ITV and most recently ESPN. His commentary of Owen’s wondergoal against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup will forever live in the memory of England fans.

5. Peter Drury, ITV & Fox Soccer

Often unfairly dubbed ‘Peter Dreary’, Drury is a well-spoken and entertaining commentator. He has a remarkable knowledge of the game and thrives in the big moments during the biggest games. Arguably his most thrilling work was during last season’s Manchester City 3-2 QPR match for Fox Soccer, where Sergio Aguero scored a late title-clinching winner for City.

4. Steve Wilson, BBC

Wilson has often been overlooked for the biggest games on Match of the Day in favour of the much-maligned Guy Mowbray, but his commentary style is perhaps the clearest of them all. He has the ability to keep up with play using quick, engaging and efficient language, and rarely makes mistakes.

3. Martin Tyler, Sky Sports

Head honcho of Sky’s commentary team, Tyler’s career has spanned across numerous eras of football. Usually understated and reserving his enthusiasm for the biggest Premier League and European games, Tyler’s most famous piece of commentary came in Manchester United’s 3-2 win over Aston Villa in 2009, where 17-year-old Federico “Machedaaaaaa!” scored a last-gasp winner.

2. John Motson, BBC

“Motty” is the godfather of commentary. Having retired from calling the action at international tournaments, Motson typically covers games in London for Match of the Day. He is nudged down from the top spot due to what many critics have correctly said about his increasingly frail and error-laden commentary – but that should not detract from the 67-year-old’s marvellous career.

1. Jonathan Pearce, BBC

Pearce beats his famed BBC colleague to top spot by virtue of some memorable and flawless commentary. Without doubt the BBC’s finest live commentator, some of the most enjoyable work in his career came in 2001 during England’s 5-1 ‘Müllering’ of Germany in Munich, where he worked for Capital Gold Sport. The line “England have gone naff in Germany!” was just one of many gems that night.

And now, the bad (and in Mark Lawrenson’s case, the ugly):

10. Guy Mowbray, BBC

It is baffling to many armchair and pub viewers alike why Guy Mowbray continues to be awarded the biggest gigs in football commentary. He cannot bring himself to make a definitive judgement on many controversial incidents and he is usually off the pace with his languid and dull style. He should be afforded some respite from his many critics for his famous “Agueroooooooo” line in the climax to the 2011-12 Premier League season.

9. Chris Waddle, ESPN

Waddle is not shy of making criticisms of current players, but when you are responsible for one of the most painful moments in English football history, you can hardly hide. Alongside Champion at ESPN, he has a tendency to state the obvious and offers tired, useless analysis of live matches.

8. Alan Green, BBC 5Live

Green is another opinionated commentator who has drawn criticism from far and wide. His style is actually listenable and articulate, but he lets himself down by hovering over his criticisms of players for too long – often to the detriment of his output.

7. Robbie Savage, BBC 5Live

Savage has cultivated a punditry career seemingly out of thin air. He certainly uses up a lot of air too, with his frenzied commentary style for 5Live, and offers little or no original analysis. He has also become the voice of 5Live’s 606, which is the perfect place for his dim comments to be hidden amongst others.

6. Craig Burley, ESPN

One of the more enjoyable co-commentators on the list, Burley gets onto the bad side due to his unprofessional nature. He is often guilty of bullying Champion during live matches and, given Champion’s well-respected and insightful commentary, his obvious misplaced dislike for his colleague makes him appear in a bad light.

5. Steve Bower, BBC

Currently being groomed by the BBC for a commentary place in football’s biggest arenas, Bower is unworthy of such a privilege. He rarely gets enthused by big moments in matches and has a distinctly monotone style which feels out of place on Match of the Day.

4. Martin Keown, BBC

Making the grade for the BBC’s Euro 2012 coverage, Keown should count himself lucky that the Beeb ignore the hundreds of tweets about his commentary every time he picks up a co-commentators mic. Littering his calls with errors, mispronunciation and recycled clichés, Keown’s commentary is every bit as cringeworthy as his punditry.

3. Andy Townsend, ITV

There are few plastic Irishmen in this world, and if they are all like Andy Townsend, I hope none of them get a commentary job in their lives. Constantly stating the obvious, Townsend’s only redeeming feature is that he is not afraid to say if a player is offside, rather than the usual “it’s marginal” sitting-on-the-fence attitude.

2. Mark Lawrenson, BBC

“Lawro”, or rather, ‘LOL-o’ is prone to making awful puns and jokes during live commentary for the BBC. A fond wearer of revolting shirts and a model of the balding mullet, a tirade of abuse was directed his way during the Euro 2012 final for what the Twittersphere correctly perceived to be an abhorrent lesson in commentary. That he was partnered with Mowbray for the same match caused many viewers to switch over to ITV or Flog It on BBC2.

1. Mark Bright, BBC

I have no doubt that ‘Brighty’ is a nice enough bloke, but his commentary is useless. He deflates rather than inspires, confuses rather than enlightens and, more importantly, bores rather than delights. It is perhaps testament to the dearth of co-commentating depth-in-strength possessed by the BBC that Bright continues to journey to World Cups and European Championships. Bright is the strongest reason to ditch ex-player co-commentators, but if we didn’t have them, over half of this list would be null and void and I would not be blogging. So thanks Mark, it appears you do have a use after all.

Advertisements

Who are the best and worst football pundits?

In the UK, we have four television channels that regularly screen live football matches or highlights – and each of them has a mixture of good and bad pundits.

One question remains though. Who are they? Let’s take a look.

The Good

5. Mick McCarthy, ex-BBC

The entertaining Yorkshireman has a no-nonsense attitude on screen and on the sidelines. Currently manager of Ipswich Town, McCarthy started off the season with a stint on Match of the Day 2, to acclaim from the footballing world.

His accessible knowledge of the game was fascinatingly displayed with some incisive and to-the-point analysis. The fact that he gets player’s names correct, and does not bore people to sleep, also helps.

4. Pat Nevin, 5Live & ITV4

The likeable Scot is mostly heard on our radio stations, but occasionally he is afforded a place on our TV screens – somewhere he should be more regularly.

Nevin’s accurate analysis, particularly in the Europa League, and his neutral take on games, provide viewers with a balanced and informative reading of the beautiful game.

3. Lee Dixon, ITV

A surprise selection perhaps, Dixon is noted for his fair and accurate punditry. Being a Manchester City fan and a former Arsenal right-back, Dixon manages to assess fixtures in an unbiased manner.

With his excellent analysis of defensive situations, and an affable on-screen personality, Dixon gets a place in my top three pundits.

2. Kevin Keegan, ESPN

Also a controversial choice on face value, Keegan has established himself as ESPN’s lead pundit.

Despite his challenging opinions, Keegan has a habit of spotting things other pundits miss.

This makes him a more accurate pundit and this, together with his knowledge of the game and engaging personality, makes him a good watch.

1. Gary Neville, Sky Sports

Said to have taken punditry to a new level, Neville is enjoying an unprecedented level of respect amongst the footballing community for his detailed and insightful analysis.

In his element on Sky’s Monday Night Football, Neville has a touchscreen TV at his disposal, and he uses it to maximum effect by offering viewers a state-of-the-art insight into the mechanics of a football match.

Having also taken his punditry into the commentary position alongside Martin Tyler, Neville is arguably the UK’s stand-out football expert.

The Bad

5. Mark Lawrenson, BBC

It’s hard to like Lawro. If his shirts are horrendous, his punditry is even worse.

Lawrenson’s chummy relationship with Gary Lineker and Alan Shearer on MOTD is another bug-bear, and he offers little originality or decisiveness – on his predictions column on the BBC Sport website he invariably predicts 1-1 whenever the top Premier League teams clash.

The ex-Liverpool defender also turns his hand to commentary for major tournaments – frustratingly so. His sense of humour (call me hypocritical) is annoying, and he never seems to fail in making matches less appealing. Worth his place in the worst five.

4. Steve Claridge, BBC

Perhaps the most boring of all pundits on TV, Claridge has the ability to do little else but annoy. His knowledge of league football on the Football League Show is hardly inspiring, and can sometimes detract from the generally exciting matches on show.

Also a radio pundit on 5Live, Claridge is just as underwhelming, often stating the obvious and hiding behind the lead commentator.

3. Gareth Southgate, ITV

Having been out of the managerial hotseat for almost three-and-a-half years, Southgate has been filling a punditry position on ITV while he continues to look for a new job.

That job can’t come quick enough, with Southgate being one of the drabbest pundits around.

His ability to emulate Claridge and state the obvious is accentuated by his lack of insight.

Southgate is also culpable of forgetting player’s names and is sometimes picked on by his more assertive colleagues – notably Roy Keane.

2. Robbie Savage, BBC & 5Live

Aside from his irritating on-screen demeanour, Savage’s opinionated punditry is often inaccurate.

His biggest flaw though, is picking up on something and referring to it in unwavering fashion throughout the match – particularly on 5Live.

This is evidenced by his recent barrage of criticism towards Rafael da Silva in the Champions League last week, accusing the Brazilian of not trying hard enough to contain Cristiano Ronaldo – the fact is, who can?

It was widely held in the national papers on Thursday that Rafael actually had a decent game, unbeknownst to Savage.

This fascination with such observations leaves his punditry with a serious case of ‘tunnel vision’ – one which we could all do without.

1. Martin Keown, BBC & ESPN

Easily the worst pundit on our screens.

The former Arsenal defender had a formidable reputation on the pitch, and is now building one in the studio for all the wrong reasons.

Guilty of making embarrassing gaffes, mispronouncing names and using laughable cliches, Keown’s dour punditry is now being exposed.

Always frowning and fond of making a blind-alley point to round off a discussion, Keown should count himself lucky that both ESPN and the BBC see him as indispensable.