Spurs ease past toothless Anzhi

First-half goals from Jermain Defoe and Nacer Chadli guided Spurs to a simple 2-0 Europa League win against an insipid Anzhi Makhachkala side at Saturn Stadium.

Spurs now lie top of Group K with maximum points from two games having kept consecutive clean sheets.

In truth, Spurs were never troubled by a limited Anzhi side, whose budget was slashed by billionaire owner Suleyman Kerimov in August, prompting an exodus of star names such as Samuel Eto’o and Willian.

The effect of the two-thirds budget cut also saw Anzhi play at FC Saturn Moscow’s compact Saturn Stadium, several hundred miles from their Dagestan home.

In cold conditions, Anzhi made an enterprising start with striker Pavel Solomatin twice troubling a high Spurs defence, but the North Londoners registered the first shot on target when Sandro’s bobbling effort found the gloves of Yevgeny Pomazan.

An uneven playing surface ensured that the fluency of both teams was hindered in a first 30 minutes that passed without incident, but Anzhi finally threatened when a firm pass from Solomatin found Serder Serderov, forcing Hugo Lloris to hastily smother the ball at the midfielder’s feet.

Spurs tried to feel their way into the game, with Lewis Holtby ubiquitous, and the German playmaker linked up with Walker down the right before cutting inside and curling a long-range shot which Pomazan acrobatically palmed clear.

Moments later Holtby turned provider for the opening goal, sliding a perfect pass into the feet of the in-form Jermain Defoe, allowing him to lash home emphatically into the roof of the net from 12 yards.

Holtby was fast proving to be the controlling influence on an otherwise indifferent first-half, and he aimed an inviting cross-field pass to Kyle Walker, affording the right-back time and space to find the incoming Nacer Chadli who swept home past the grasp of Pomazan to give the visitors a 2-0 half-time lead.

Anzhi boss Gadzhi Gadzhiyev reacted to a poor first half by fast-tracking Ivorian striker Lacina Traore onto the pitch at the restart, despite his ongoing recovery from a shoulder injury.

Traore, recognised as the last remaining big name at the club following the U-turn in ethos ordered by Kerimov, was instantly a problem for the Spurs defence.

Holding the ball up well, he started an Anzhi move which led to right-back Benoit Angbwa shooting wide from outside the area, before Spurs replied when £25m forward Erik Lamela found Chadli who curled a shot wide after a quick break – again down Anzhi’s left-hand side.

Russian full-back Andrey Eschenko was introduced before the hour-mark, and he combined with fellow substitute Traore to work Lloris following a quick move on the left as Anzhi showed signs of improvement.

Solomatin drove ambitiously from an angle to force Lloris into a smart save, but Spurs cleared the resulting corner and broke forward with Holtby tamely shooting at Pomazan.

As the ambient temperature plummeted the quality of play also dropped off, but Spurs were dealt a blow on an otherwise easy night for them when Younes Kaboul hobbled off with a quarter of the match remaining.

Spurs manager Andre Villas-Boas reacted by making two quick changes, with captain Michael Dawson replacing the Frenchman in central defence and the disappointing Lamela making way for in-form Gylfi Sigurdsson.

Solomatin again tried his luck from range late on, volleying towards goal, but Lloris calmly pushed his dipping shot wide of goal.

If the travelling Anzhi fans needed any excuse to leave early after their team’s meek display, the special charter train laid on by Kerimov to escort them back to Moscow left the ground five minutes from the end. Yet, they could have left at half-time as Spurs were never in danger of relinquishing their grip on an easily-earned three points.

  • You can follow me on Twitter @NeilWalton89
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Will England miss out on World Cup 2014 qualification?

Nestling beneath the predictable hyper-positive build-up to England’s forthcoming fixtures against San Marino and Montenegro is an important caveat which continues to be overlooked.

The prospect of England not qualifying for the World Cup in Brazil next summer would have been largely unthinkable when they thumped Moldova 5-0 in their first qualifying match last September.

Since then, Roy Hodgson’s men have only recorded one more win in three games – a 5-0 drubbing of lowly San Marino – which was sandwiched in between disappointing 1-1 draws against Ukraine and Poland.

Despite being two points off leaders Montenegro in Group H, England know that defeat to the Montenegrins on Tuesday would put them five points adrift of automatic qualification (assuming they beat San Marino tomorrow), and provided Montenegro also sweep aside minnows Moldova.

A five point gap, with four games remaining, could be insurmountable as the Three Lions would still face a tricky fixture away to Ukraine and a crucial match at home to Montenegro, who have already proven they can frustrate England – they recorded two creditable draws against them in qualification for Euro 2012.

If England were to miss out on automatic qualification, they could face a play-off against the likes of Spain or France in a worst-case scenario.

Dangerous teams such as Portugal, Sweden and Croatia are also play-off prospects after average starts to their respective qualifying campaigns.

This means that victory for England in Podgorica on Tuesday is absolutely essential, yet it doesn’t seem clear cut at all.

England’s defenders have deserted them. John Terry has retired from international football, the recalled Rio Ferdinand’s intricate pre-match preparations were deemed sufficient for him to withdraw from the squad, while Gary Cahill, Michael Dawson, Phil Jagielka and Phil Jones are all injured.

This means that England’s centre-back partnership will most likely hinge upon Joleon Lescott and Chris Smalling, despite neither player being regular choices for Manchester City or United respectively.

Lack of match-practice and a relative level of inexperience when compared to other players means that Montenegro’s in-form strike partnership of Stevan Jovetic and Mirko Vucinic – both prolific scorers for Fiorentina and Juventus in Serie A – will be licking their lips on Tuesday.

It’s a hazardous situation for England, but one which they can overcome.

A draw would not be the worst result for them, but it could potentially allow Poland to move level on points with them when they inevitably thrash San Marino the same day.

Defeat would move a play-off position ever closer, and the probability of coming through a two-legged tie against difficult opposition is no better than evens.

So, amongst all the world-beating headlines that will stick to the England team throughout the next few days, the gory sub-plot of failing to qualify for the World Cup remains an all too realistic shadow – and one which will intensify over Hodgson’s head should the unthinkable materialise.