2017 Tour de France preview

2017 Tour de France preview

Chris Froome

Chris Froome provided one of the iconic images in cycling history by running up Mont Ventoux in 2016 following a crash with a TV bike. 

2017 Tour de France preview

The 2017 Tour de France appears to be the most open edition for many years, with at least six contenders as the 198 riders prepare for the opening stage in Duesseldorf.

Defending champion Chris Froome has had an indifferent build-up to the Tour, failing to win a single race – a key indicator that he could be beaten come Paris on July 23.

Add to that an extremely flat profile for the race in general and the odds are stacking against the three-time champion.

So, who has a realistic chance of stepping on top of the podium on the Champs-Elysees?

The contenders

Froome will have his work cut out to win his fourth yellow jersey. His form has been good but not spectacular this season, allowing rivals such as former Team Sky super domestique Richie Porte to become genuine candidates for victory.

BMC’s Porte started the season in excellent form, winning the Tour Down Under, before suffering misfortune in the Paris-Nice stage race.

He was then crowded out by tactical riding when well-placed for the Criterium du Dauphine title, allowing the unheralded Jakob Fuglsang to take the overall win.

The Dauphine is often considered a dress rehearsal for the Tour and the sheer unpredictability of the 2017 edition means that the Tour is wide open.

Fuglsang is not expected to have lasting legs for the duration of three weeks, but he could mix things up for his Astana team leader Fabio Aru, who missed the 2017 Giro d’Italia due to injury.

Then there is the prospect of dangerous climber Nairo Quintana tackling the Tour after his second place in the Giro.

The Colombian, who would normally be among the top two or three favourites, has restricted himself to training rides since finishing in Italy as he tries to disprove the trend that sees riders flunking in the Tour having ridden the Giro.

Spanish legend Alberto Contador will also try for the maillot jaune. His form has been good this season and suffered a two-second loss of the Paris-Nice to Team Sky rider Sergio Henao.

Romain Bardet represents the best French hope, but the AG2R rider is notoriously poor in the time trials – and there are 36.5 kilometres against the clock in 2017.

Best of the rest

Team Lotto-NL Jumbo’s Robert Gesink finished a brilliant sixth in the 2015 Tour but has failed to recapture that form, finishing a poor 41st in the Dutch national championships and third in the national time trial.

Diminutive South African Louis Meintjes is steadily improving and could well earn a top-ten finish, while the always-smiling Esteban Chaves represents a danger if he can find some form.

The other jerseys

Double world champion Peter Sagan is virtually a nailed-on certainty to claim the green jersey for the points classification, with the Slovakian having won the maillot verd at each of the Tour of California, Tirreno-Adriatico and Tour de Suisse this season.

He has also won the Tour de France green jersey for the past five seasons.

However, given the flat nature of this year’s Tour, Marcel Kittel could be in with a shout too.

If Chris Froome falls terminally behind in the General Classification, he may well go for the King of the Mountains points.

Quintana is the likeliest to go for the polka dot jersey though, having expended so much energy in the Giro.

Several of the GC riders could elect to do this with the race being so open this year, which would add an extra layer of excitement to an already fascinating edition.

With his GC hopes, Meintjes is set to battle with Briton Simon Yates for the white jersey in the young rider’s classification.

The stages

With what little climbing there is, Tour organisers ASO have been sure to include famous mountains such as the Colombier, Galibier, Izoard and Peyresourde.

There is a disappointing amount of mountainous summit finishes – four – and just five official mountain stages.

This makes the time-trials all the more crucial – and currently Richie Porte is the best man against the clock of the GC hopes, although he has a tendency in his career to blow up in the third week of Grand Tours.

The opening stage in Germany is a prologue, meaning Tony Martin begins as hot favourite to snare the first yellow jersey of the race.

The Brits

British involvement is two riders higher than 2016 at nine, with Team Sky and Dimension Data each responsible for picking three Brits each.

Sky have selected Froome, Luke Rowe and Geraint Thomas, while Dimension Data have gone with new national road and TT champion Steve Cummings, Mark Cavendish, who races despite still recovering from glandular fever, and Scott Thwaites.

Yates will ride for Orica-Scott, while Ben Swift and sprinter Dan McLay compete for UAE Team Emirates and Fortuneo-Vital Concept respectively.

Denouement

It promises to be an edge-of-your-seat Tour this year as the GC riders see what is effectively a level playing field in front of them without there being a clear favourite.

Plus, with so few mountains to separate them, the time-trials will carry even greater significance than usual.

If Porte can hang on for the final week, he will go into the penultimate stage in Marseille as the probable favourite – provided he hasn’t lost time before that.

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Sky’s Tour bid rests with Froome – Tour de France 2013 preview

A peloton of 198 riders will amass for 21 leg-crushing stages of the 100th Tour de France on Saturday – a journey over three weeks that will lead the greatest annual sporting event in the world over a distance of 2,115 miles.

To celebrate the centenary of cycling’s most iconic race, the organisers have compiled a route that takes in the legendary mountainous climbs of Alpe d’Huez (twice on stage 18), and Mont Ventoux – with the Tour culminating in a sunset finish on the Champs –Elysees in Paris.

For the first time in the race’s history the island of Corsica will feature when it hosts the opening three stages or ‘grand depart’ of the race.

The Pyrenees will also be navigated in the first week before the infamous Mont Ventoux ends the second with the Alps looming large in the third.

It is a truly brutal Tour and with the addition of three time-trials (one team and two individual) the 100th edition of this race is one of the most eagerly anticipated.

Once again, Great Britain has a pre-race favourite in Team Sky’s Chris Froome.

With 2012 winner Sir Bradley Wiggins unable to defend the famed yellow jersey because of a knee injury, cycling has been starved of what would have been a momentous rivalry.

Wiggins had planned to defend his crown after the recent snow-hindered Giro d’Italia – but Froome had long been placed as Sky’s team leader for the Tour, and the friction between the two riders has been uncomfortably evident ever since.

The source of the pair’s inclement relationship is widely reckoned to be the 2012 race when Froome, the stronger climber of the two, demonstrated his strength by attempting to leave Wiggins on a couple of crucial stages – only to back down and support him to victory in a further display of loyalty to the team.

For 2013, Wiggins was earmarked to be Froome’s right-hand man, but his subsequent withdrawal has saved Sky from a glut of unwanted media attention.

The duo’s Sky team-mate, Australian rider Richie Porte, will instead support Froome in the high mountains and will be the team’s back-up plan should Froome suffer injury or huge time losses.

Froome’s form has been exemplary in the run up to the race, with the Kenya-born Brit winning four out of five stage races this season – including the Criterium du Dauphine and the Criterium International, both of which are good indicators of a rider’s Tour de France form.

In doing so, Froome has emulated Wiggins’ performances of 2012 – and he will hope to provide the same end result.

But he will face strong competition from Spain’s Alberto Contador, twice a winner of this event, and his Team Saxo Bank –Tinkoff Bank squad.

Contador has seasoned Tour riders such as Nicholas Roche, Michael Rogers and Roman Kreuziger at his disposal but Sky, who will rely on Kanstantsin Siutsou and David Lopez alongside Porte in aid of Froome, will be confident of holding off the diminutive Spaniard.

Other contenders for the General Classification victory include the aggressive Spanish duo of Joaquim Rodriguez and Alejandro Valverde, along with promising Colombian rider Nairo Quintana – who will vie with BMC’s Tejay van Garderen for the best young rider’s white jersey, or ‘maillot blanc’.

Cadel Evans, who enjoyed a fine podium finish in the Giro, will also be in contention – as will the dangerous trio of Jurgen van den Broeck, Robert Gesink and Ryder Hesjedal.

Meanwhile, Britain’s Mark Cavendish, who last week won the British National Road Race Championships, has the chance to write his own piece of history during his quest for the green sprinter’s jersey.

He is currently fourth on the all-time list of Tour stage wins with 23, just 11 behind the great Eddy Merckx. A healthy six stage wins for the ‘Manx Missile’ would propel him above French legends Bernard Hinault and Andre Leducq into second on that list.

However, Cavendish could be the first rider to wear the ‘maillot jaune’ as the Corsican first stage seems custom-made for his explosive sprinting abilities.

Last year’s winner of the green jersey Peter Sagan will be Cavendish’s main threat, as the Slovakian is a stronger climber than the Briton and may look to escape on the hillier parcours later in the Tour to claim vital intermediate sprint points and maybe a couple of stage victories – just as he did last year.

One of the Tour’s most interesting sub-plots is the King of the Mountains classification, which is always unpredictable as the best climbers tend to stay in the peloton to conserve energy rather than chase the points on offer for cresting the summit of each categorised climb.

As a result, France’s popular Team Europcar member Tommy Voeckler – not renowned for his climbing – got himself into several breakaways last season to mop up the points on offer and claim the polka dot jersey.

Cycling fans will also be glued to the fortunes of current world champion Philippe Gilbert, French cult hero Voeckler, Andy Schleck – making his Grand Tour comeback after a fractured pelvis – and German sprinters Andre Greipel and Marcel Kittel, who will provide a stern test for the likes of Cavendish, Sagan and Matt Goss in bunch sprint finishes.

But the hundreds of millions of eyes watching this inspiring event will likely be watching Froome and his battle with Contador.

While it is not the Froome vs. Wiggins clash the cycling community had so relished, it promises to be a fascinating match-up – and one which is worthy of the centennial staging of this colossal race.

Wiggins embarks on Giro d’Italia mission

Sir Bradley Wiggins will begin his quest to become the first British winner of the Giro d’Italia tomorrow when the opening Grand Tour of the 2013 season departs from Naples.

Team Sky’s Wiggins, who has never finished higher than 40th in the Giro, will attempt to claim the ‘maglia rosa’, or pink jersey, from 2012 winner Ryder Hesjedal, who is aiming to defend his title with his Garmin-Sharp team.

Wiggins’ bid is significantly helped by 92.3km (57 miles) of time-trialling across the 21 stages, which is his main strength – a fact underlined by his superb gold medal-winning performance in the time-trial at London 2012.

However, the brutal high mountain stages of the Giro will likely play into his rivals’ hands.

One such rival is home favourite Vincenzo Nibali, who has already beaten Wiggins at the Giro del Trentino this season – a race seen as perfect preparation for the difficult parcours of the Giro d’Italia.

Wiggins did have a mechanical failure on the queen stage of that race, but the form of the Astana man in the high mountains will be of concern to the Briton, who can struggle at times with steep gradients.

However, Wiggins claims to have made improvements in the climbing discipline and, with two of the three time-trials completed by the time the riders enter the Italian Alps in the second week, he will hope to have built up a lead over his General Classification rivals.

The final week looks particularly hazardous, with the Giro entering the French Alps for a summit finish on the legendary Col du Galibier on stage 15, before ascending the infamous Tre Cime di Lavaredo in the Italian Dolomites on the penultimate stage.

Attacks will almost certainly be fired at Team Sky’s train of climbers, but whether they will be fruitful depends on the strength of Wiggins’ team of dedicated domestiques.

Colombian’s Sergio Henao and Rigoberto Uran, the latter an Olympic road-race silver medallist, will provide the power when the gradients, biting the riders at close to 20% in some places, start to kick up.

Christian Knees, Konstantin Siutsou and Dario Cataldo will also assist Wiggins in the higher terrains as Sky look to control the pace at the front of the peloton in typically robust style.

The Giro will also take in the stunning views of the revered Passo dello Stelvio on stage 19, and this could be a perfect opportunity for Nibali to strike a telling blow to Wiggins’ hopes if he is fresh enough.

Nibali and Hesjedal, although seen as Wiggins’ main rivals, will not be the only threats with a number of dangerous riders also joining the peloton.

Australian rider Cadel Evans, who has battled a debilitating virus for the past season, will be aiming for a top five finish at least with his BMC squad, while Spain’s Sami Sanchez is also a formidable climber.

Dark horses, and riders to watch for the future, include Mauro Santambrogio, who finished just behind fellow countryman Nibali in the recent Giro del Trentino and Holland’s Robert Gesink, who will be competing in his maiden Giro d’Italia.

Ivan Basso, a two-time Giro winner, will miss out owing to a buttock cyst, but Wiggins would have expected to beat the veteran Italian regardless of his injury.

Elsewhere, Mark Cavendish will spearhead the Omega-Pharma Quick-Step team as he goes in search of stage victories ahead of the Tour de France.

He will face competition from seasoned sprint rival Matt Goss and the electric John Degenkolb, who dominated the Vuelta a Espana sprint classification last season.

Other Britons include David Millar, who will work diligently for Hesjedal on the Garmin-Sharp team, the duo of Adam Blythe and Steve Cummings on Evans’ BMC squad, and the talented Alex Dowsett who will ride in support of 2011 Vuelta winner Juan Jose Cobo on the Movistar squad.

But the focus will undoubtedly be on the Wiggins, Nibali and Hesjedal fight at the pointy end of the race. All three riders look to be in peak form – with some tipping Hesjedal, who has impressed in the Spring classics this season, to retain his crown.

Wiggins, though, will be a prominent force in the time-trials and, if he can perform to the best of his abilities, may well have the race sewn up by the time the peloton rolls into the Alps during the second week.

His dream of emulating boyhood hero Miguel Indurain in standing on the top step of the podium in Brescia wearing the famous maglia rosa could not be closer and a victory in this illustrious race would unquestionably move the popular Briton a step closer to cycling immortality.